Saturday, 3 July 2010

Cymbalta

DULOXETINE - ORAL
Pronunciation: (dull-OX-eh-teen)
Brand Name(s): Cymbalta


Duloxetine is used to treat major depression and anxiety. In addition, duloxetine is used to relieve nerve pain (peripheral neuropathy) in people with diabetes. It is also used to treat pain caused by a condition called fibromyalgia that affects the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and supporting tissues.

This medication is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) that works by helping to restore the balance of certain natural substances in the brain (neurotransmitters). Duloxetine may improve your mood, sleep, appetite, and energy level, and decrease nervousness. It can also decrease pain caused by nerve damage.

Cymbalta Oral Side Effects

Nausea, dry mouth, constipation, loss of appetite, tiredness, drowsiness, dizziness, increased sweating, blurred vision, or yawning may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: fainting, unusual or severe mental/mood changes (e.g., nervousness, unusual high energy/excitement, rare thoughts of suicide), shakiness (tremor), decreased interest in sex, changes in sexual ability, difficulty urinating, change in the amount of urine, weight loss.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these rare but very serious side effects occur: stomach pain, bloody/black/tarry stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, easy bruising/bleeding, muscle weakness/cramps, yellowing eyes/skin, dark urine, seizures, unusual tiredness, fast/irregular/pounding heartbeat.

This medication may rarely cause a very serious condition called serotonin syndrome. The risk increases when this medication is used with certain other drugs such as "triptans" used to treat migraine headaches (e.g., sumatriptan, eletriptan), certain antidepressants including SSRIs (e.g., citalopram, paroxetine) and other SNRIs (e.g., venlafaxine), lithium, tramadol, tryptophan, or a certain drug to treat obesity (sibutramine). See also Drug Interactions section. Before taking this drug, tell your doctor if you take any of these medications. Serotonin syndrome may be more likely when you start or increase the dose of any of these medications. Seek immediate medical attention if you develop some of the following symptoms: hallucinations, restlessness, loss of coordination, fast heartbeat, severe dizziness, unexplained fever, severe nausea/vomiting/diarrhea, twitchy muscles.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

Cymbalta Oral Interactions

The effects of some drugs can change if you take other drugs or herbal products at the same time. This can increase your risk for serious side effects or may cause your medications not to work correctly. These drug interactions are possible, but do not always occur. Your doctor or pharmacist can often prevent or manage interactions by changing how you use your medications or by close monitoring.

To help your doctor and pharmacist give you the best care, be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products) before starting treatment with this product. While using this product, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any other medicines you are using without your doctor's approval.

Certain medications taken with this product could result in serious (rarely fatal) drug interactions. Avoid taking MAO inhibitors (e.g., furazolidone, isocarboxazid, linezolid, moclobemide, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine) with duloxetine for 2 weeks before treatment, during treatment, and at least 5 days after your last dose of duloxetine. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: drugs that can cause bleeding/bruising (e.g., aspirin, antiplatelet drugs such as clopidogrel, NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, "blood thinners" such as heparin/warfarin), drugs to treat high blood pressure (e.g., clonidine, guanethidine), drugs removed from your body by certain liver enzymes (e.g., cimetidine, antipsychotics such as perphenazine, antiarrhythmics such as propafenone/flecainide/quinidine, certain quinolone antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin, antidepressants such as desipramine/fluoxetine/imipramine/paroxetine), fluvoxamine, sibutramine, thioridazine, "water pills" (diuretics such as furosemide).

Aspirin can increase the risk of bleeding when used with this medication (see above). If your doctor has directed you to take low-dose aspirin for heart attack or stroke prevention (usually at dosages of 81-325 milligrams a day), you should continue taking it unless your doctor instructs you otherwise. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

Also tell your doctor if you take any other drugs that increase serotonin, such as buspirone, dextromethorphan, lithium, meperidine, propoxyphene, phentermine, SSRIs, other SNRIs, tryptophan, St. John's wort, drugs used to treat migraines such as "triptans" and dihydroergotamine, street drugs such as MDMA/"ecstasy," amphetamine. (See also Side Effects section.)

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you also take drugs that cause drowsiness, such as certain antihistamines (e.g., diphenhydramine), anti-seizure drugs (e.g., carbamazepine), medicine for sleep or anxiety (e.g., lorazepam, zolpidem), muscle relaxants, narcotic pain relievers (e.g., codeine), psychiatric medicines (e.g., chlorpromazine, quetiapine, nortriptyline, trazodone).

Check the labels on all your medicines (e.g., cough-and-cold products) because they may contain ingredients that cause drowsiness. Dextromethorphan is a commonly used cough medication and may interact with duloxetine. Ask your pharmacist about using those products safely.

Cimetidine is a nonprescription drug that is commonly used to treat extra stomach acid. Because it may cause undesirable interactions when used with duloxetine, ask your pharmacist about other products to treat stomach acid.

Do not consider this as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on A Spicy Boy, A Cat, & My Fat Ass. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. A Spicy Boy, A Cat, & My Fat Ass understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider.



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